Deputy EVP Tony Sharon to retire

September 10, 2019

Dear MIT faculty and staff,

I write to share the news that following much reflection in recent months, Tony Sharon has let me know of his decision to retire as deputy executive vice president at the end of the current calendar year, following 20 years of exceptional service to the Institute.

I first met Tony in 2004, when we both participated in MIT’s Leader to Leader program. I was immediately impressed by him, and my admiration has only grown since then. Tony’s unwavering dedication and deep appreciation of MIT's mission have been invaluable over the past six years of our close work together.

Tony’s extensive experience, along with his distinctive and approachable interpersonal style, made him an obvious choice to become MIT’s first deputy executive vice president. Since accepting the role in 2013, Tony has been one of my closest and most trusted advisors. He has created bridges and strengthened relationships across MIT, while partnering with me to lead our senior management team and oversee the operations of MIT’s administrative areas.

After 25 years of service in the United States Air Force, Tony began his MIT career at Lincoln Laboratory in 1999 as the assistant leader of the Advanced Satellite Communications (SATCOM) Engineering and Operations Group. He was appointed as Lincoln Laboratory’s assistant director for operations in 2006, responsible for the Laboratory’s operations, annual operating and capital investment budget, and government research contract.

Under Tony’s leadership as MIT’s deputy executive vice president, the campus has experienced an unprecedented period of capital renewal, through both comprehensive upgrades to aging facilities as well as new construction. With his guidance, deferred maintenance has steadily declined since 2015. Tony’s commitment to improving student housing has been critical as we have advanced renovations to dormitories and new construction for both undergraduate and graduate students. His significant contributions to the Institute will have visible and lasting impact well into the future.

Tony has also been pivotal in attracting talent to a number of important leadership positions across the administrative areas, and he has played a key role in building and mentoring the next generation of administrative leaders for the Institute. Over the coming months, with the benefit of the very strong team that Tony has put in place, we will work to distribute his portfolio of responsibilities across the organization.

We will have occasion to celebrate Tony and his contributions later this fall, but for now, I hope you will join me in expressing our gratitude to him for his tremendous service to MIT.

Sincerely,

Israel Ruiz